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some questionable issues

Posted: Tue Jun 13, 2017 6:08 am
by Adam cyphers
so I've had Adventure since last fall and these are the issues I have found.the patch on the bottom is new and I am currently in the process of sanding her down for a new coat of bottom paint.i haven't had much luck in figuring out what are the issues.if anyone has any suggestions is much appreciate it. I plan on putting her in the water in the next week or so.unless you folks see a reason(s) I shouldnt.thanks in advance
https://imgur.com/gallery/KUqD9

Posted: Tue Jun 13, 2017 6:40 am
by Guster
It looks like it was damaged from the keel swinging too far forward and contacting the forward part of the trunk. I think this is fairly common, happens when the cable brakes. I did a small repair on mine in that location. Mine didn't compromise the hull at all just exposed a few layers of glass. Its hard to tell how extensive the damage was on yours, that's a sloppy repair. I don't think it will be a problem.

Your keel pin/bracket is some sort of homemade job. It looks like a long bolt or threaded rod was used for the pin. I can't comment on how well that set up will work, but it is worth keeping a close eye on. Watch for leaks in that area.

The Patch on the bottom doesn't look like any glass was added. Just ground down and possibly coated with epoxy? I'm not sure why the hole was drilled through. Maybe they were installing a through hull and drilled the pilot hole in the wrong place. I would probably redo that patch with a few layers of glass.

Good luck,

Dan

Posted: Tue Jun 13, 2017 6:53 am
by Adam cyphers
Three or four layers of glass mat were added. that picture was taken before the other side of the hole was filled. The hole was drilled because she sat in a boat yard and it's more economical for them to put a hole in the hull then to take a ladder and pump out every boat when it rains

Posted: Tue Jun 13, 2017 12:21 pm
by Guster
Adam cyphers wrote:Three or four layers of glass mat were added. that picture was taken before the other side of the hole was filled. The hole was drilled because she sat in a boat yard and it's more economical for them to put a hole in the hull then to take a ladder and pump out every boat when it rains


That makes sense.

I apologize, when I zoom in on the photos I can now see the glass mat.

Be sure to post some photos after bottom paint and a good deck wash. That should make for a dramatic before/after set up.

Dan

Posted: Sat Jul 15, 2017 11:24 am
by Adam cyphers
So we put her in and she promptly began leaking somewhere around the keel pin. going to try to drop the keel today and see what the issue was. Any helpful tips?

Posted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 11:30 am
by EmergencyExit
A helpful pictorial on dropping the keel from our very own Capt. Scott
http://www.captainscottsailing.com/?l=3

Posted: Tue Jul 18, 2017 6:22 am
by cummings
Something bothers me about this marina. Who gave them permission to drill a hole in the boat? I don't care if it's easier, who's going to pay for the repair to the boat caused by their policy?

Personally, if at all possible, I'd find another marina because that's just not right.

I can't say much about the rest except that the forum has postings that cover most of the questions you asked. I took an entire day and read every single posting made to the board. I found lots of useful bits of information.

Posted: Wed Jul 19, 2017 3:56 pm
by Adam cyphers
Cummings I understand why you would be upset but she hasn't seen water in 15 years. And has been abandoned. So what is much easier for them to take these boat to have been abandoned drill a hole somewhere that will let most of the water out and hopefully be able to resell them to recoup some of the money owed to them. If that is not the case and they have sunk they're in the water or they get too much water in them on land they are cut up into pieces so I would have to say that a small hole that is easily patched is better than cutting them up and throwing them away. The owner of this Marina gave me my boat because he could see how much I enjoyed sailing. I also am an eighteenth-century living historian and routinely spend time on tall ships and small period wooden boats. Her bottom is a nice blue color now and my girlfriend and I scrubbed her down the other day. I'll post a link as soon as I can she's looking much better with a little paint and elbow grease. If anyone is interested I'll throw a couple pictures of the tall ships in as well

Posted: Wed Jul 19, 2017 3:57 pm
by Adam cyphers
While I'm thinking of it when anyone be so kind as to flip over their table and give me measurements so I can position my table bracket appropriately as I have to rebuild the table

Posted: Wed Jul 19, 2017 7:16 pm
by Reality
If the marina drilled the proper size hole to drain it, it would be simple to just install a drain plug or other through hull fitting with valve.

Posted: Wed Jul 26, 2017 6:44 pm
by astrorad

It looks like it was damaged from the keel swinging too far

Posted: Fri Jul 28, 2017 7:05 pm
by Careyr
This is late and at the end of a string of comments but I have something to add.

I got my boat 7 years ago and - in ignorance - wound out the winch cable until I heard a crunch. I winched in some wire, sailed it for a week and during that week I remember being quite annoyed that water was entering the hull on the boat I had just purchased.

I have spent all my time since that first sail with the boat on the hard, being re-built. I never did find that leak though, until just several years ago while I was lying under the boat, planning how to drop the keel. Water (rain water in the boat) started dripping on my forehead from a hairline crack, fore-end of the keel trunk. I poked and probed until I had a large hole, previously packed shut by someone with something. After opening the hole up until the patch was all removed, I put in as many layers of fiberglass as it took to build back to hull thickness, and then added a few more layers spread further out on the hull and up the trunk front.

Since that time, and this is why I am posting, I found a Chrysler document complete with information on how many winch turns it takes to lower the keel to a specific angle, 60 degrees being the lowest the keel should ever be allowed to drop.
I am in the process of making a sign with that information and installing it near the winch so there is no doubt how to have the keel at the angle you want. Here is the link to that document. Good information to have on hand in the boat.
http://captainscottsailing.com/Chrysler ... rboard.pdf